Rock the Blog Part 4

This post is a continuation of a series about different angles you can use to create a successful (and addictive!) blog.  So far, the types of blogs I’ve covered include The Insider, The Living-The-Dream-er, The Personal, and the Hobbyist.  Here are two more that have the potential to hook readers.

 

The Expert: The Dermatology Blog

The Dermatology Blog is written by Dr. Jeffrey Benabio, a practicing dermatologist in San Diego, California.  Dr. Benabio gives skincare tips and advice, weighs in on natural remedies and skincare trends, passes on interesting studies and advances in dermatology, and answers readers’ questions about everything from eczema to hives. In addition to his popular blog, Dr. Benabio has successfully set himself up as the go-to dermatology expert for all sorts of magazines, newspapers, and television shows.

The key to writing a fantastic Expert blog is to, well, be an expert.  A real expert.  Preferably an expert with degrees, publications, or some other sort of credentials to back up your claim to expert status.  Expert blogs share some of the same features of Insider blogs (see my post Rock the Blog Part 2), with a few key differences.  Whereas Insider blogs give readers a window into a “secret world,” Expert blogs are more focused on providing accurate information and a professional level of advice.  Expert bloggers also tend to give more coverage to technological, scientific, and/or social trends and advancements in their area of expertise.

The Socialite: Mission Mission

If you have your finger on the pulse of your city, neighborhood, campus, or subculture, you might be a great candidate for writing a Socialite blog.  A great example of a Socialite blog is Mission Mission, which is written by a collection of young people living in San Francisco’s Mission District.  It’s nothing fancy:  the posts are very short and very photo-heavy, documenting funny sightings, local characters, and the daily goings-on of the neighborhood.  But the blog has gained a wide following because it successfully captures the spirit and whims of the twenty-something hipsters who flock to the Mission District.

Socialite blogs are often collaborative (after all, one person can’t possibly go to every party or catch every show at the latest underground music venue…) The result is a collage of impressions and photographs which can be very addictive to peruse.  Socialite blogs are often snarky or sarcastic in tone (think Vice magazine) so if you’ve got a smart mouth and like to take pictures, a Socialite blog might be a great way to launch yourself into the blogosphere.  Socialite blogs often find ready audiences among young people, who are eager to see themselves and their subculture represented in social media.

This is the last post (for now) in my series on blogging angles.  In my next post, I’ll be taking a break from blogging-about-blogging to check in on some publishing news.

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